Born to be Wilde By Eloisa James (Wildes #2)

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Always a perfect weekend read

Published by Piatkus Books, 31st July 2018, 384 pages, £5.99

Born to be Wilde begins beautifully, as all of Eloisa James’ novels, perfect for early morning commutes and lazy Sunday noons. It instantly claims you from the first few sentences and fills you with that warm, soothing glow you expect from a classic regency romance.

Lavinia Gray, friend of the scandalous Wildes clan who we were introduced to in Wilde in Love, is in trouble. The money has gone and her mother has committed crimes. In a fit of desperation she turns to Parth Sterling, unofficial Wilde member, bosom pal of her friends’ husbands and self-made rich bachelor. Despite being the one who has always irritated her, prickled her with his comments about her frivolity, caused her to retaliate with childish taunts, she asks for his hand in marriage. But he turns her down. That is what she expected anyway. Why would sensible, serious Parth want her anyway? And she doesn’t want a man who lacks understanding, compassionate and respect. As she comes to terms with her rejection, she realises how hurt she was. However, her proposal was not born out of love… or was it?

Parth has already chosen a perfect bride for himself. Someone who ticks all the boxes and is as practical as he is. When he learns part of Lavinia’s problems, he volunteers to find her a husband, the best candidate being a Prince. But he also finds it hard to get her proposal out of his head. When Lavinia realises she can earn money by doing what she loves best, she grows in confidence. Parth is able to understand her interests more, and the longer they spend time together on his ‘matchmaking’ trials, he realises that practicality is no match for what he has been denying for years.

I loved how the two MCs gradually accepted their feelings for each other. A deliciously stubborn coupling who bicker, clash heatedly and are drawn together like magnets. My favourite scene was a reckless rain-soaked one. Typical but quite necessary. We also follow Lavinia’s journey to earn independence and save her mother, learning about 18th fashion and addiction on the way. However, the narrative struggled to keep my interest towards the end and falls a little flat towards the final fifty pages. Still waiting for the best of the series.

Many thanks to Little, Brown/Piatkus for my copy xxx

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BLOG TOUR: The Sapphire Widow by Dinah Jefferies

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To be published on 5th April 2018, Viking Penguin, 400 pages, £5.75

Courage. Grief. Passion. It always amazes me how Dinah Jefferies can create characters with such immense inner strength and intense vulnerability. Every year I wait to get lost in the sensory and emotional explosion of her writing. The Sapphire Widow is set in Ceylon during the 1930s. Louisa is a young wife besotted with her charming, handsome and charismatic husband Elliot. She is convinced they have the perfect marriage, but still struggles with their inability to have children and Elliot’s reckless behaviour. After the shock of his sudden death, strange mysteries and terrible secrets are revealed, exposing  a side of her husband she had never known or truly acknowledged.

This novel was a real journey. Amongst the utterly gorgeous descriptions of the everyday scenes, sights and smells of Ceylon, Jefferies unravels a compelling tale of heart-break and betrayal. The reader slips effortlessly into Louisa’s routine, her inner thoughts, needs and anxieties. We are gently eased into a story about marital issues, which at first appear typical, but are soon revealed to be tiny cracks towards a dark mesh of secrets. After news of Elliot’s sudden death, Louisa discovers each of these with thrilling fast-paced succession. Whilst she struggles to process the consequences of Elliot’s behaviour, the reader tries to catch up with the baffling and dangerous turn of events. We then follow Louisa’s attempts to pick up the pieces, find some sort of resolve and move on with admirable composure. Jefferies writes about grief with tenderness and delicacy.

There is a small but stable set of secondary characters lending both uplifting support and grating antagonism. Louisa’s path runs into Leo, an owner to a Cinnamon plantation where Elliot spent much of his time. Silent, steely and sensitive, Leo is blatantly Elliot’s opposite. Her attraction to him is immediate but troubling. Is it her vulnerable need for companionship or the start of a bond stronger than her whole marriage? As she tries to negotiate her feelings, there is no doubt that she depends on Leo, who is the only link to one of Elliot’s mysterious legacies. A really absorbing read.

Many thanks to Penguin for my review. Can’t wait for another story soon…

Read review of other books by Dinah Jefferies

Say You’ll Remember Me by Katie McGarry

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Published HQ YA, 30th Jan 2018, 464 pages, £3.99

A great read, but unfortunately not the most powerful of Katie McGarry stories. Walk The Edge  still remains for me the most intense and romantic. Say You’ll… is about a privileged but stifled governor’s daughter and an alleged convict on a government rehab scheme. Drix was convicted of a crime he didn’t commit. The time he spent away was still a reality check for the reckless lifestyle he led and when he was chosen to take part in the governor’s ‘Second Chance’ program, it seemed like an opportunity to get his act together concerning school and family. The program aims to keep young offenders from returning to crime and reintegrate back into society, as well as providing publicity for the governor’s campaign trail. His daughter, Elle faces constant pressure to be the perfect politician’s daughter, in the way she acts, looks and creepily who she might be dating. Everything is planned, cultivated and controlled. This leaves little room for exploring her identity and interests, especially if she has been raised to do what she is best at rather than what makes her happy.

The whiff of Drix and Elle’s instant attraction is caught immediately by Elle’s parents, who make it clear that Drix is completely off the radar; especially if it indicates her father’s program being tainted with bias. Likewise, Drix is fully aware that getting involved with the governor’s daughter, a man who has given him the only lifeline he has had in many years, is the worst first step he can make.

I really wanted to be swept up in this story. There is plenty of feisty flirting, but the dialogue carried on longer than it needed. There was a lot of sentimental and motivational talk, but repeated and continued rather than amounting to action. This novel taps into many interesting topics such as controlled and abusive relationships, double standards in politics and rehabilitation programs. There is also the mystery of who actually committed the crime, resulting in an action packed struggle at the end.  However, I just didn’t latch on as I normally would for a McGarry instalment, maybe just needed more punch and heat rather than emotion. I will of course keep reading and I can’t wait for the story, be it in this series or a Thunder Road (please!) one.

XX

 

 

 

Begin Again by Mona Kasten

 

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Published Nov 2017, Bastei Entertainment, 278 pages, £4.31

A sizzling new adult novel that got sparks flying between the MCs pretty much from the first page. I kindly received a copy from the publishers after the cover caught my eye on twitter. I wasn’t expecting anything unique, just a familiar plot of love-in-denial and dramatic spins. It mostly delivered and made a nice transitional read between more serious texts. If you are experiencing an endless winter season, it is an ideal book to crawl away with and escape under the sheets.

I think there is something seductive about new experiences in plot, following a character who moves to a new town and meets new people. Allie runs away from her domineering parents to start college and begin a new life. The only available apartment left, however, is owned by the most intolerable, arrogant and insensitive (but of course incredibly attractive) guy. Determined to suck it up, she agrees to move in with Kaden and grudgingly accepts his outrageous ‘rules’, one being never to talk about her ‘girl problems’.  But of course, with each day the beast reveals snippets of his vulnerability and painful memories. Just as they begin to connect, their past lives seep back in causing mayhem and destruction.

There is some clumsy narration where the story lacks subtlety, and certain scenes were a little crass for me, which is the case for many contemporary NA, especially college based ones. The characters are not the most memorable, but the pacing and build-up of heat between them is well done. Their friends add a comedic touch to the story. A tiny bit of lag during the bonding moments, but this picks up towards the second half of the book. Simple, direct and satisfying.

Many thanks Bastei for my copy.

xxx

For more live-in romances I would recommend Japanese high school drama ‘Good Morning Call’ on Netflix. And For new starts, Nicholas Spark’s Safe Haven.